The #SVYALit Hangout on Hazing

The #SVYALit Hangout on Hazing: January 28, 2015 — @TLT16 Teen Librarian Toolbox.

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The #SVYALit Hangout on Hazing: January 28, 2015

Join us on Wednesday, January 28th, 2015 at 12 Noon Eastern for a Google Hangout

led by Press Play author Eric Devine and featuring Brutal Youth author Anthony

Breznican and Leverage author Joshua Cohen. The topic will be hazing. Learn more

about the #SVYALit Project. Noon Eastern, 11 AM Central

Have a question you want to ask? Leave it in the comments or Tweet me at @tlt16.

Google Event Page: https://plus.google.com/events/cn9nkrfe4sff5vauinlij7kbkqg

YouTube Event Page: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVIEZDALC_g

You can watch live or come back here any time to watch the archived footage.

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Bearing Witness to Violence, a guest post at Teen Librarian Toolbox

Hey, I have a guest post up over at one of my favorite sites, Teen Librarian Toolbox. You can read it here, or click the link below, and read at Karen’s site. She has a treasure trove of excellent content, so be careful to set aside a few hours.

Bearing Witness to Violence, a guest post by author Eric Devine — @TLT16 Teen Librarian Toolbox.

Recently I was at a school in Harlem, giving my standard presentation of how I became an author and what my work is about, and I found myself at the section on Press Play, which many of the kids had read, and I was nervous to speak about the story’s roots. There, before me, sat multiple athletes and the athletic director, and I looked at them and said, “I hate jock culture. That doesn’t mean I hate athletes or sport, but I do detest the privilege athletes are given merely because they are strong, or can run fast, or throw a ball well. Those same privileges, by and large, are not afforded to students of similar academic prowess, and that is a problem.”

Boy do I know how to work a crowd :)

Yet, in spite of the bristling athletes and the way the director looked at me, they began to nod as I talked about how I looked at this concept in my work.

Press Play is about Greg Dunsmore, who is his own worst enemy. Bullied for being overweight, he has turned to his phone and the movies he makes with it for solace. He lies with his film and has a reputation because of it. He is a pariah, especially in a school dominated by its devotion for the boys’ lacrosse team. So in his senior year, for his film class documentary, as a way of demonstrating he is more than the lies and the taunts, Greg decides to film his weight loss. He wants this for himself, not for them, or possibly as a way to make one honest film. Therefore, he sets out with his “friend” Quinn to train. While doing so, the boys hear something going on during the lacrosse team’s indoor practice in a nearby gym. Greg grabs his phone and they investigate. This sets in motion the dilemma of the novel, because Greg finds the team brutally hazing the underclassmen and gets it on film.

What does one do with such evidence? Go to the principal or the authorities. But how does one do that when the principal is the coach and seemingly everyone in the town has either played the sport or is financially connected to the team?

And so the story takes on these two dimensions: the will-he-won’t-he-Hamlet-like waffling of Greg, alongside the increasingly horrific abuse. This scenario is an unfortunately common parallel to so many who find themselves in sexually violent scenarios. Who can you trust when your trust has been taken? How can you move on when you have experienced what you have, and yet in your gut know others may be victims?

Because it’s all about power, and so often victims have only their voice matched against entities infinitely more powerful than themselves. And so they stay quiet, and who can blame them?

Yet, here we have Greg, witness to the acts, with evidence, and in the age of all things internet, the possibility of a voice powerful enough. But he’s a liar. Has proven that time and again. What can he do, after years of being abused and subsequently and callusing himself with lies, to now help these victims?

I’ll let you read the story to find that out.

But I can tell you that after I detailed this scenario to the athletes and the school’s athletic director, it opened up a conversation in which the director asked about hazing in their school’s program.

Now, on the spot like that, I’m not one bit surprised that the kids said nothing occurred. So of course I asked, “Does it not occur, or do you not recognize it for what it is?”

That caught them off-guard.

And I think that this question is the key to the #SVYALit program. Replace “hazing” with “rape” and then ask the same question above to a teenager who isn’t comfortable talking about sex, much less a violent encounter with sexual elements. I think the response is universal, and is the one I received from the boys: shrugged shoulders, and a “maybe.”

This is why I am proud to be a part of the conversation. Because teens do commit violent acts against one another, and many have sexual aspects that make them rape. And yet teens are not fully aware of this, nor how to talk about it. Therefore, the chat Anthony BreznicanJoshua Cohen, and I will have on 1/28 is important. Hazing abounds in high school, in small incidents and in massive, conformist ways. And often it teeters on, and then falls into, sexual assault, and may be the one area in this spectrum of violence where boys are more represented than girls. That worries me. That predilection, or at least that shoulder-shrugging acceptance of violence, sexual or not, paired with the privilege of athletics, is a noxious creation.

Please, tune in, or catch our conversation after the fact. The angles of this issue are vast and knotty, and only through relentless exploration and discussion will we ever make headway. Because a shrug in the face of the aftermath of such violence is not only unacceptable, it is reprehensible.

Join us on Wednesday, January 28th, 2015 at 12 Noon Eastern for a Google Hangout led by Press Play author Eric Devine and featuring Brutal Youth author Anthony Breznican and Leverage author Joshua C. Cohen. The topic will be hazing. Learn more about the #SVYALit Project.

More on Hazing at TLT:

Take 5: Hazing

Initiation Secrets: Press Play and a look at hazing with author Eric Devine

Breaking Tradition: BRUTAL YOUTH author Anthony Breznican on the fight against hazing

Meet Our Guest Blogger:

Eric Devine is the author of fearless fiction: Press PlayTap OutDare Me, and This Side of Normal. He is also a high school English teacher, husband, and father of two girls. Eric is represented by Kate McKean of the Howard Morhaim Literary Agency.

About Press Play:

Greg Dunsmore, a.k.a. Dun the Ton, is focused on one thing: making a documentary that will guarantee his admission into the film school of his choice. Every day, Greg films his intense weight-loss focused workouts as well as the nonstop bullying that comes from his classmates. But when he captures footage of violent, extreme hazing by his high school’s championship-winning lacrosse team in the presence of his principal, Greg’s field of view is in for a readjustment.
Greg knows there is a story to be told, but it is not clear exactly what. And his attempts to find out the truth only create more obstacles, not to mention physical harm upon himself. Yet if Greg wants to make his exposé his ticket out of town rather than a veritable death sentence, he will have to learn to play the game and find a team to help him.
Combine the underbelly of Friday Night Lights with the unflinching honesty of Walter Dean Myers, and you will find yourself with Eric Devine’s novel of debatable truths, consequences, and realities. – October 2014 from Running Press Kids

Feeling the Love at Park East HS

Park East

This past Friday, upon entering the library at Park East High School in Harlem, I heard the following from the students seated at the computers:

“For real? Is that the famous guy right there?”

“Yeah, he’s the one from the posters everywhere. The author.”

I was there through the Author Adopt-A-School program to present on my work––Press Play, in particular––and explain how I transformed from someone, who as a teen, enjoyed reading and writing, to someone who now writes novels for teens.

However, a large part of me, whenever I present at a school, is also there as the teacher I am as well. And so, in spite of the kind remarks I’d heard, it was with trepidation that I met classes during the last two periods of the day. On a Friday. The first week of school after a two-week Christmas break. Yeah, the deck was stacked against me.

Except it wasn’t. These kids couldn’t have been better. They were so very appreciative of me being there. They said “thank you” and shook my hand so readily, it made me feel phenomenal. Kind of like the “famous” person they believed me to be 🙂

During the presentation, they seemed to love my back story, of how I sprinted from grad school to marriage to parenthood and yet kept writing. They shook their heads at the ridiculousness of my experience of being rejected so many times, and revising so many pages to then not sell anything. And they truly enjoyed the personal stories of how each of my books came to be.

But, post-presentation, I always wonder how well I have done. I can usually sense where I stand, but it can be difficult to gauge politeness versus sincerity. It was very obvious that these kids were sincere. They begged the librarian to pick up copies of Tap Out and Dare Me, and later on, I picked up a few new Twitter followers 🙂

So, yes, an absolute success. And I couldn’t be happier to have been a part of such an excellent program. The perks of being an author are not contained within pages; they are very much about everything that happens in the real world, because of the gift I’ve been given to have my words in others’ hands.

Thanks, again, Park East, for making feel so welcome, and for reinforcing the love I have for what I do. Happy reading.